Caitlin Roper – Reclaim the Night Perth 2018

Caitlin Roper

Andrea Dworkin said, “…it is an agony to be fully conscious of the brutal misogyny which permeates culture, society, and all personal relationships.”

Male violence against women thrives in a culture of misogyny, one in which men have a sense of ownership and entitlement to women, and one in which women are regarded as ‘less than’, as mere sexual conquests, or as existing for men’s use and entertainment.

It is this culture of misogyny that shapes the discourse surrounding men’s violence against women. Men’s violence against women is treated as something that happens to women, rather than something men do to women. Mainstream media uses watered-down terms like ‘domestic violence’, ‘family violence’ or ‘violence against women’ when what they mean is men killing women.

In a culture of misogyny, men’s violence against women is widespread. On average, one woman is killed by a current or former partner each week in Australia. This year, 57* women have been killed by men, and it’s still October.

In July, we gathered in Hyde Park to mourn the loss of Eurydice Dixon, a young woman who was raped and murdered by a man as she walked home from her stand-up comedy performance. Days later, another man, also a stand-up comedian, vandalised the site, spray painting an ejaculating penis where Eurydice had been raped and murdered in a statement of utter contempt for women.  

In the last six months in WA alone, there have been three separate mass killings where men have allegedly killed their families. Men who were husbands, fathers, grandfathers, brothers, sons and son-in-laws, massacred five women and nine children. One of these men was Peter Miles, who shot and killed his wife, daughter and her four children while they slept. In media reports documenting the incident, Peter Miles, having just committed mass murder, was described as a “good bloke”. How little value do we place on women and children that a man can execute six of them and still retain his status as a good man?

A culture of misogyny means that the responsibility for men’s crimes of violence is placed on women, who are taught from childhood to navigate the world with the ever-present threat of male violence. We know that entering the public space presents a number of risks- men loudly appraising our bodies, putting their hands on us, yelling abuse or ‘compliments’. We know our bodies are regarded as public property and that walking down the street may be seen as an invitation. And so we modify our behaviour and restrict our basic freedoms, as if by following the rules we can guarantee our safety, all the while knowing we never can, because women cannot prevent men’s violence. The reality is, most violence against women is not perpetrated by strangers, but by men we know, and most of all by men we love.

In a culture of misogyny, women who come forward as survivors of men’s physical and sexual violence are punished. Women around the world watched as Dr Christine Blasey Ford recounted the experience of being sexually assaulted as a teenage girl and the impact it had had on her life.

We saw ourselves in her. We needed her to be heard, to be believed. We were desperate for evidence that women matter, that our stories matter. Our hearts were broken when, despite credible allegations of sexual assault, the US Senate voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the supreme court anyway. It was yet another blow when we saw her publicly mocked by the President of the United States while his audience laughed, an echo of the laughter of the teenage boys who assaulted her, that haunted her over the years.

We know that men’s violence against and sexual exploitation of women is widespread. We know that one in three women will be victims of physical or sexual violence in their lifetimes, that police respond to domestic violence matters every two minutes, and that men’s violence is the “leading preventable contributor to death and illness for women aged 18 to 44”. We know all this, yet when women exercise the tremendous courage required to come forward and report these crimes against them, as a society, we tear them down. What were they wearing? Were they drinking? Why did they put themselves in that position? Why didn’t they leave? We tell women they contributed to the assault, that they invited it, they provoked it, or even that they wanted it. We call them liars and hateful names, we cast them as the aggressors and their rapists as the real victims, and after all this, have the gall to question their failure to come forward sooner. We say women are basically equal now and that it’s a scary time to be a man.

A culture of misogyny means there are rarely lasting consequences for men who commit acts of violence against women and children. Their reputations are not tarnished, their careers are not over. Almost no rapists, even those reported, will ever set foot in a prison, and most men who sexually abuse children will never be held accountable. Committing sexual assault does not even disqualify men from the supreme court, or the White House.

Like many women, I’m angry. I’m angry that women are treated as though we are disposable. I’m angry that we are still not being heard. I’m angry that women who speak against male violence are met with hostility or derision, while men’s lethal violence is met with indifference. I’m angry that the most common response to condemnations of male violence is “not all men” and not “What can I do to change this?”, as if the real issue is women making men uncomfortable rather than men killing us. I’m angry that in the coming weeks and months, women who are today alive will be dead.

So tonight we march against male violence. We march for our sisters, for those women and children lost to male violence. We march for our rights. We will not stop fighting.

Caitlin Roper

Reclaim the Night Perth, Russell Square

26 October 2018

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Robyn Westgate – Reclaim the Night Perth 2018

RTN Perth 2018 Banner

Hi, I am Robyn, and I’ve been invited to speak here tonight because I have lived experience of domestic violence and sexual assault.

I am also an academic who began studying and researching to try and understand what had happened to me … and why?

And… why it had been allowed to happen?

Lived experience is a nice term isn’t it? Very clean and smooth.

Easier to hear I suppose than if I were to say I have been beaten, raped, sodomised, abused, bullied, controlled, manipulated, kept isolated and poor… but these are the unfortunate facts of my life – and an amazingly high number of other women in our society.

And it seems like we use nice generic terms to smooth over the too confronting bumps rather than upset the audience – or the politicians and media.

Now I do need – and want – to say one thing. Women are not the only victims of domestic and family violence. Nor are men the only perpetrators.

Domestic and family abuse is unacceptable regardless of the perpetrator’s gender or relationship to the victim. However; of the reported statistics women and children overwhelmingly make up the greater proportion of victims, so please forgive any generalisations based on that.

Generally, Violence towards women is from someone they know…but not always.

A long time ago, when I was young, I lived on the edge of Northbridge.

It was not the modern trendy hub it is today. In those days it was quite grotty, and dark.

I had been on a night out with some girlfriends. It was late. I was sober, but my friends were quite sozzled and had hooked up or were otherwise engaged.

I decided to walk home. It was only about 3 kilometres I suppose, and I should have been fine. I was young and believe it or not – fit.

About a kilometre along I thought I could hear footsteps behind me… My imagination, right?

Further along I became aware of a presence behind me.

It was a semi industrial office sort of area with very little residential buildings. I saw people sitting on the darkened veranda of a run-down house in Carr Street.

I felt a degree of relief and headed towards the house if nothing else in the hope that I was mistaken and the person behind me would pass me.

There were three men on the veranda, and none of them spoke English.

By this time, I was scared, and thinking do I face one man, or go to three strange men?

I could see my units… so surely, I could make the last 500 metres or so safely?

I didn’t.

I was grabbed and assaulted as I crossed the well-lit car park of my units.

Despite my awareness of the person behind me, and of being at risk, I didn’t scream straight away.

Shock and fear initially robbed me of my voice.

My attacker kept saying he wouldn’t hurt me. Depends on your definition of hurt I suppose.

I was trained in self-defence

I was part of a demonstration squad for a martial arts group…

all that went out the window, forgotten in the shock of it all, and in fear.

I resorted to the more primal – eventually I screamed, and I fought… pure struggling and scratching. It took what seemed an eternity, but I am sure it wasn’t, and people responded.

Everything from shut the f up with that screaming

what’s all the noise about,

and then the cavalry rushing out to help.

My attacker ran off and I was not “raped” in the legal definition

but I was hurt and very shaken.

I did not realise that in Perth at the time there had been a series of similar attacks and a specialist fast response team of police responded to the call. As people the two male detectives were nice enough, but it was a case of why were you out? What were you doing on your own?

At the time I felt like it was at least partly my fault.

Many other things happened in my life and I am defiantly not the young, fit, naive woman I was.

Because of this incident and many others in my past I am hypervigilant and very cautious of being out alone, day or night.

I have been involved a lot with offenders, so I am aware of how some assess situations to find the right, vulnerable victim.

I am old and slow now, often need to walk with a stick for balance, so I am a target.

It is a horrible shock to realise most women have a similar awareness. Unfortunately, it is something that has become the norm that many women and girls need to have this form of awareness to prevent becoming the victim violence.

 

That assault was nearly 40 years ago. Also, about 40 years ago was the start of the reclaim the night movement.

This is where I must apologise to our superb Auslan translator …(name)… because I only just added it.

40 years and nothing has changed, if anything the situation of female safety has become worse.

In the month of October this year 9 women have been killed.

Look at the nine women closest to you – nine women.

According to the Red Heart website, at the time of writing 65 women have been killed in Australia – victims of homicide or manslaughter – since January. I say at the time of writing because I wrote this yesterday and sadly the number of female victims of homicide and manslaughter so far this year the number could have gone up by tonight.

That sounds awful and trite and sensationalist, but it is a hard and horrific possibility.

 

I don’t know if it is because society – and women – have become more mobile and consequently it is more necessary and able to be out and about, and therefore more easily victimised, but the numbers of assaults and attacks on women have not gone down.

Reclaim the Night what started as a response to the murders committed by Peter Sutcliffe, the man dubbed the Yorkshire Ripper who killed 13 women and attempted to kill 7 more in and around Leeds in 1977.

Understandably fear gripped the community…women were told for their own safety not go out at night. Reclaim the Night was in response to that fear – saying we will not be intimidated, we have a right to go safely in public.

Reclaim the night has developed into a much bigger international movement and phenomenon where women and the community say      … enough.

The “me too” movement has recently inspired people – women and men – to start lobbying for more safety and sexual safety in society, be it in public, at home or in the academic or workplace.

 

But why?

Why?     Despite 40 years of public lobbying and conversation, why has so little to changed?

I do not know the answer.  

The frequency of violence, particularly violence against women and children in our community is a very complex question.

The circumstances of each woman’s death are individual yet there is an over riding pattern of violence against women.

It is easy to blame men, and as I said earlier it is true that statistically most violence is perpetrated by men – against women, children…and other men.

But there are a lot of good men out there, good men who want things to be better …safer…for women and children but I wonder if some of them know what exactly they can do to help promote change?

It is still far too hard, too unsafe to report assaults and sexual assaults.

Yes, there are support workers who are amazing, well trained empathic police who are supportive and understanding, medical staff who truly care and support victims of violence.

But it is not enough.

Until there is a major cultural shift in our communities and our homes that shows females are valued and precious, and that life and safety is a right and not a privilege – it will not be enough.

Until this cultural change then leads to change in how the court system looks at violence, and violence against women it will remain “too hard”.

There are baby steps being taken –

and we should acknowledge and praise that –

but society and communities are a long way off yet.

 

We need to encourage talking about this,

not to smooth it over with nice safe words and descriptions that are pollie speak or make for good sound bites.

We – women and men, young, old, all points in between – should try to be aware of people whose attitudes towards violence are unacceptable and voice that it is unacceptable – not aggressive, calm and controlled will win, but say “enough”.

There’s a good campaign around now about men telling their friends or colleagues if they are inappropriate…this good and needed but also very hard.

Do you know how hard it is to be the first person to do something different? To stand up and be counted? That first time is difficult, in a group and individually.

If you know a woman or man who does have the courage to stand up and speak out, say thank you, compliment them on their strength – little things can make a difference Talk to each other. Be open. Be encouraging.

If you have sons, nephews raise them with awareness.

.

Women should not have to read on the net or the news things like…

 

5 safety tips for women who walk alone at night

Personal safety in Perth

Safety tips for women- common sense safety tips

 

We should not have to read them and take them on board – but for the moment please do!

Talk to people. To community.

Another big thing for me is not to let complacency or feeling that you as one person, or even you as a group cannot do anything.

I get concerned that as subjects such as DV, and violence against women, violence in general becomes more talked about people stop listening.

When you first hear about this sort of violence there is shock, outrage even, interest.

As more people talk about it some people begin to switch off because they feel they have heard it before, it becomes normalised to hear people talking about DV and women being murdered – people are talking about it now, so things must be changing, there is no need for me to be involved, everything is under control…

Do not stop listening.

Do not stop talking about things that are very important.

Support and encourage others to discuss this, to keep interest and indignation high.

This is a matter that requires community and social change.

We are community and society

We are power,

We have voices.

If we affect one person we have made a difference, and who knows where that will lead?

 

Robyn Westgate

Reclaim the Night Perth, Russell Square

26 October 2018

Dorinda Cox – Reclaim the Night Perth 2018

Dorinda Cox.png

Welcome everyone to this evening’s important annual event, the Reclaim the Night March.  

Can I firstly start by acknowledging the land which we are gathering this evening as the land of the Whadjuk Noongar people, their Elders past and present and their future and emerging leaders and Elders. Can I give a quick shout out to all my mob who are not here tonight as this event clashes with Wardanji – a festival which tonight is being held in Fremantle to celebrate the survival of our culture and for me this was a difficult choice to come and support this cause (which I am so truly passionate about) but also to find time to celebrate which we don’t get time to do because we are so caught up in the fight for our rights – the deficit language and the constant battle against systems that we sometimes forget how important it is to celebrate and make time to do this for ourselves and our communities.  

For me this event is so important and after being a child survivor of family violence and working with women and children for nearly 20 years in services and communities – I never shy away from having some of these difficult conversations, for those that know me are well aware of the love I have for being the activist I am to give voice and agency to those that need it most and for me this is why being here with you all tonight is so important.  

I have been fortunate to grow up here in Perth – our wonderful and vibrant city that has provided me and my family with great opportunity and wealth.  I can only speak from my experience as a Noongar woman – a woman in her 40s, educated and self-employed. I grew in the outer suburbs of the buzz of the cultural metropolis of Fremantle our local city growing up as a teenager, attending the local high school and frequenting the nightlife in my early twenties.  I didn’t actually discover Northbridge and the rest of Perth until late twenties so I led somewhat a sheltered life in the danger that these streets can and do hold for women and in particular women like me who don’t look like everyone else.

I am married to my husband who originally comes from Ireland – half a world away and his upbringing and experiences in life have been very different from me, one because he is a man but also that he is not indigenous and there not subjected to the same systemic and societal experiences that I have had as an Aboriginal woman.  

Together we raise our two daughters – Ailish and Ciara will grow up straddling the third space – the third space will be their constant space that we as a society impose by being non-inclusive.  This space will be constant and sometimes exhausting as we strive to keep this space open for our women and girls in particular – the experience of navigating societies view of their Indigenous heritage and the mainstream, these are bound up in their individual and collective experiences

My girls are not visibly indigenous – they don’t have the brown skin or the broad nose, something which are society continue to filter as the identification of Aboriginal or Indigenous people in our country.  But my girls will have a strong sense of their history and the legacy which has been given to them by having an Aboriginal mother and grandmother.  As strong girls and eventually women they will be able to stand strong in their convictions and identity as Aboriginal women – the women of the next generation.

But on the negative side of that they will carry the burden of vulnerability for a race – a race that sees our women 30 times more likely to be victims than any other and in some areas of Australia up to 80 times more likely to be victims of violence.  

Only a few short months ago I gave the acknowledgement of country at the Perth vigil for Eurydice Dixon – a Melbourne woman murdered by a stranger an all too familiar story here in Australia – but not as common as the women who are subjected to violence by people they know and we now have 57 women that have been murdered across this country of ours due to violence.  

Community safety is about 3 things for me, one being personal safety – the one thing we are constantly taught as young girls and women.  The second is safe streets and spaces which is about the responsibility of everyone to ensure that we are all safe but in particular our women and children and the last one is about building resilient communities – because without these we are not able to talk about personal safety or the broader issues of safe streets and spaces because without strong and resilient communities the conversation is silent – our voices and the need for us to be safe is silent.  

For me claiming back this space – reclaiming the streets and in particular the night is that we the Aboriginal people of this country – the oldest living culture on the planet have roamed this earth for 65 thousand years.  In the ancient days our women would always walk first – before the men because we came in peace – without threat or to do harm. And we did this without fear!

For me reclaiming the night this evening is about me being about to say out loud and proud that I don’t just reclaim the night for tonight but also we reclaim our place in society.  We need to be able to walk the streets without fear!

Dorinda Cox

Reclaim the Night Perth, Russell Square

26 October 2018

40 years on and women are still marching for their right to feel safe

RTN Perth 2018 Banner

For the last 40 years women in Australia have marched each year to assert our rights to safety! Join us at 6:30 pm in Russell Square on Friday October 26 to march through Northbridge and protest male violence.

2018 has seen a number of high profile killings of women. The rape and murder of Eurydice Dixon mobilised the entire country, while WA has been rocked by 3 mass killings of women and children. This is in addition to untold numbers of assault, battery, rape, and harassment.

Each public story brought with it a sea of excuses for the perpetrators to remind us that men’s lives are more important.

As we saw this year, like every year, men targeting women in public spaces is only part of the picture.

Women cannot count on our homes being safe for us. Violent men most often target women they know, often in intimate or family settings.

Reclaim the Night has happened in Australia for 40 years and we are still seeing women being killed by their fathers, brothers, sons, and husbands, boyfriends, partners. We still face the threat of male violence in our homes, at work, at school, and just walking down the street.

The choices made by men to commit psychological, physical and sexual violence against women is enabled by the very social structures which should be protecting us. Male violence against women is supported and sanctioned by a complex web of social structures and manifests in various ways including:

  • 1 in 3 women is raped in their lifetime
  • Less than 1% of reported rapes result in a guilty verdict and jail time
  • Of the women who are subject to domestic violence,⅓ first experience it when pregnant

These statistics and incidences aren’t random. They are connected by the underlying beliefs and power structures in our society.

Reclaim the Night is an opportunity to reclaim the spaces we inhabit as we meet at Russell Square to speak out, to make it clear that these are not isolated events but are instead all connected as part of a society that encourages male violence against women.

Women will stand together to demand change.

We demand a society and legal system in which women and children are safe.

We will march through the streets of Northbridge together, showing the power of women united to reclaim public spaces for women and demand a world which is safe for us.

 

Reclaim the Night Perth is a grassroots collective of women dedicated to creating a world without male violence. We are part of the global Reclaim the Night and Take Back the Night movement.

 

Why Reclaim the Night Perth is a Women Only Event

Reclaim the Night began over 40 years ago in response to women being told to stay inside and out of public life to protect themselves when serial killer Peter Sutcliffe, known as the ‘Yorkshire Ripper”, was targeting women, particularly those in the sex industry. Reclaim the Night events were traditionally women only because marching was a way of physically reclaiming spaces which we had been told to give up in the face of threats of violence. Reclaim the Night Perth continues to have women only marches because we believe in women physically reclaiming public spaces as a symbolic act and demonstration of our exclusion from these places

Every woman knows the fear of being alone. Through the ever present threat of male violence against us we have learned to fear being alone on the street, after work, in crowded nightlife spots, in secluded areas, during the day, at night, and every other area of public life. We fear being alone because we fear suddenly finding ourselves in unwelcome company- with men who will harass us, taunt us, intimidate us, touch us, assault us, beat us, rape us, and/or kill us.

It doesn’t matter if we don’t experience these specific harms, although almost all of us will have experienced at least one of them. The threat of them happening is enough to keep women afraid and when we are afraid we shrink away from the spaces that we have an equal right to access.

Reclaim the Night Perth is a women only event because we center women and the oppression of women. Men do not share this common experience, so they can not march as part of the group of people demanding their freedom from this system of intimidation and control.

There exists a deeply embedded and highly persuasive myth in our society that men protect women. Of course when you ask what women need protecting from, the answer from those who believe this myth is that we need protection from men! Many of us internalise this myth even when we know it’s not true. Many women feel safer with a man around even though they are more likely to suffer violence at the hands of this man than a random man on the street.

Reclaim the Night Perth is a women only event because we reject the idea that women should be escorted by men, and because we want to encourage a recognition of women’s collective power. When men are invited to march at Reclaim the Night marches it is not in a protective role, but women marching together without men is a powerful statement of our ability to protect ourselves and each other. It is a statement to those who believe the men-as-protector myth that this myth is false. It is a statement that women do not need to cower behind men or walk side by side with them. For one evening we want to experience the security, safety, and confidence women can provide each other. Building this consciousness can strengthen women’s awareness of our shared experience and increase our confidence in taking action collectively against our oppression.

Reclaim the Night Perth does not oppose participation by men as allies of feminist actions and we welcome all male actions to end male violence and domination. The intention of this one annual event is to be women only to meet the specific strategic purpose of the march and its participants. The woman only event is to provide focus to what women experience, centre women, and have a particular impact on women and those witnessing the actions of a group of only women.

Man Murders Woman 2017 – 1 March 2017

  

Darren Patrick Clover, 52, was charged with the murder of 32 year old Tanya Burmeister and her 15 year old daughter Zoe Burmeister and a third victim, known as ‘Bluey’.
It is alleged that on 1 March 2017 Darren Clover purchased petrol before deliberately setting light to the disused Kinnears Rope factory in Footscray, Victoria.
Darren Clover is believed to have owned the factory the three victims were known to be living in but no motive for the alleged murders has yet been publicised.

Our deepest condolences go to Tanya and Zoe Burmeister’s family and friends, as well as those of the third victim.

Background:

 The summary of women killed in 2016 listed by sex of known or presumed perpetrator is located here, with the 2017 summary listed here. Unsolved cases of the death or disappearance of women are also listed on these pages where we are aware of them.

At the end of 2016, approximately 92% of the perpetrators charged with the murder, manslaughter or otherwise in relation to the death of women in Australia in 2016 were male. Where perpetrators were identified, 94% of women were killed by male perpetrators (91%) or male and female perpetrators. Only 6% of women’s deaths were caused by women acting alone.

The count of women killed by known or suspected male violence in a Australia is jointly undertaken by Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia.

We report the deaths of women as accurately as possible, updating these records as we are able to. If we have misreported any facts of this case, please contact us. We do not wish to affect any future court actions and will neither publish posts nor comments which do this.

Please bear in mind cultural sensitivities when sharing these reports. Where it is not culturally appropriate to do so, we will not report the victim’s name.

If you have any additional information about women killed by male violence in Australia in 2016, please email us at wimms@womenshoutoutaustralia.com or via the facebook pages of Reclaim the Night Perth or Women Shout Out Australia.

Reclaim the Night Perth - Saying No to male violence against women and girls

Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia

Man Murders Woman 2017 – 18 February 2017

  

Weeks after the crash, Shaun Southern has been charged with murder, reckless driving and other crimes after allegedly killing Jenni Pratt, 61, and injuring her 54 year old passenger.

Shaun Southern was allegedly witnessed driving erratically before driving deliberately at oncoming traffic on the Bussel Highway in Capel, West Australia on 18 February 2017.

Shaun Southern was hospitalized following the crash and it was some weeks before he was charged, with police apparently unclear about whether he would ever be charged.

Our deepest condolences go to Jenni Pratt’s family and friends.

 

Background:

 The summary of women killed in 2016 listed by sex of known or presumed perpetrator is located here, with the 2017 summary listed here. Unsolved cases of the death or disappearance of women are also listed on these pages where we are aware of them.

At the end of 2016, approximately 92% of the perpetrators charged with the murder, manslaughter or otherwise in relation to the death of women in Australia in 2016 were male. Where perpetrators were identified, 94% of women were killed by male perpetrators (91%) or male and female perpetrators. Only 6% of women’s deaths were caused by women acting alone.

The count of women killed by known or suspected male violence in a Australia is jointly undertaken by Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia.

We report the deaths of women as accurately as possible, updating these records as we are able to. If we have misreported any facts of this case, please contact us. We do not wish to affect any future court actions and will neither publish posts nor comments which do this.

Please bear in mind cultural sensitivities when sharing these reports. Where it is not culturally appropriate to do so, we will not report the victim’s name.

If you have any additional information about women killed by male violence in Australia in 2016, please email us at wimms@womenshoutoutaustralia.com or via the facebook pages of Reclaim the Night Perth or Women Shout Out Australia.

Reclaim the Night Perth - Saying No to male violence against women and girls

Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia

#66 – Man Murders Woman 2016

  tanya-leah-beattie

In an update to the 2016 list of women killed by men, we are sad to report the death of the 66th woman from known or presumed male violence.
Tanya Beattie, 41 had previously been on the watchlist after she was killed in an Ann St home in Eaton between November4 and 5 2016.
After a 5 week investigation, Ian Dennis Jones, 51, was charged with her murder in December 2016. He had been picked up in Boyanup 19 kms away, behaving erratically, around the time of her death. The Ann St property she was found dead in was his home.

 

Background:

The summary of women killed by sex of known or presumed perpetrator is located here. Unsolved cases of the death or disappearance of women are also listed on this page.

The count of women killed by known or suspected male violence in a Australia is jointly undertaken by Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia.

We report the deaths of women as accurately as possible, updating these records as we are able to. If we have misreported any facts of this case, please contact us. We do not wish to affect any future court actions and will neither publish posts nor comments which do this.

Please bear in mind cultural sensitivities when sharing these reports. Where it is not culturally appropriate to do so, we will not report the victim’s name.

If you have any additional information about women killed by male violence in Australia in 2016, please email us at wimms@womenshoutoutaustralia.com or via the facebook pages of Reclaim the Night Perth or Women Shout Out Australia.

Reclaim the Night Perth - Saying No to male violence against women and girls

Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia

Man Murders Woman 2017 – 19 February 2017

  In Memory Man Murders Woman 2016

A 7th man is believed responsible for the death of a woman in Australia in 2017.

Shahab Ahmed, 33, has been charged with the murder of his wife Khondkar Faihi Elahi, 29 at their Parramatta home on the 19th of February 2017.

Khondkhar was found with multiple stab wounds by police and taken to hospital but died of her injuries.

The accused’s lawyer has suggested the victim’s (alleged) behavior lead to the incident in language erasing perpetrator responsibility and blaming the victim.

2017-02-21

The Magistrate hearing his bail application, Gary Still, described the account the Shahab Ahmed gave police as chilling and denied his bail application. “He referred to court documents stating Ahmed had made multiple threats to Ms Elahi at their unit before her death and that he stabbed her repeatedly with a knife “including in the back”.”

Our deepest condolences go to Khondkar Elahi’s family and friends.

 

Background:

 The summary of women killed in 2016 listed by sex of known or presumed perpetrator is located here, with the 2017 summary listed here. Unsolved cases of the death or disappearance of women are also listed on these pages where we are aware of them.

At the end of 2016, approximately 92% of the perpetrators charged with the murder, manslaughter or otherwise in relation to the death of women in Australia in 2016 were male. Where perpetrators were identified, 94% of women were killed by male perpetrators (91%) or male and female perpetrators. Only 6% of women’s deaths were caused by women acting alone.

The count of women killed by known or suspected male violence in a Australia is jointly undertaken by Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia.

We report the deaths of women as accurately as possible, updating these records as we are able to. If we have misreported any facts of this case, please contact us. We do not wish to affect any future court actions and will neither publish posts nor comments which do this.

Please bear in mind cultural sensitivities when sharing these reports. Where it is not culturally appropriate to do so, we will not report the victim’s name.

If you have any additional information about women killed by male violence in Australia in 2016, please email us at wimms@womenshoutoutaustralia.com or via the facebook pages of Reclaim the Night Perth or Women Shout Out Australia.

Reclaim the Night Perth - Saying No to male violence against women and girls

Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia

Man Murders Woman 2017 – 2 February 2017

  In Memory Man Murders Woman 2016

A 6th man is believed to be responsible for the death of a woman in Australia in 2017.

A 50yo woman was found with life threatening injuries at a unit in Main Road East, St Albans, Vic just before 12.30am February 2, 2017.

The victim, who has not yet been named, died on the way to hospital.

Investigators were treating the woman’s death as suspicious and were looking for a 63yo man in relation to the woman’s death when his body was located.

A report will be prepared for the coroner; Police said they are not searching for anyone else in relation to the incident.

Our deepest condolences go to the victim’s family and friends.

 

Background:

 The summary of women killed in 2016 listed by sex of known or presumed perpetrator is located here, with the 2017 summary listed here. Unsolved cases of the death or disappearance of women are also listed on these pages where we are aware of them.

At the end of 2016, approximately 92% of the perpetrators charged with the murder, manslaughter or otherwise in relation to the death of women in Australia in 2016 were male. Where perpetrators were identified, 94% of women were killed by male perpetrators (91%) or male and female perpetrators. Only 6% of women’s deaths were caused by women acting alone.

The count of women killed by known or suspected male violence in a Australia is jointly undertaken by Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia.

We report the deaths of women as accurately as possible, updating these records as we are able to. If we have misreported any facts of this case, please contact us. We do not wish to affect any future court actions and will neither publish posts nor comments which do this.

Please bear in mind cultural sensitivities when sharing these reports. Where it is not culturally appropriate to do so, we will not report the victim’s name.

If you have any additional information about women killed by male violence in Australia in 2016, please email us at wimms@womenshoutoutaustralia.com or via the facebook pages of Reclaim the Night Perth or Women Shout Out Australia.

Reclaim the Night Perth - Saying No to male violence against women and girls

Reclaim the Night Perth and Women Shout Out Australia